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Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy.

The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth, creating opportunities for jobs and careers in a sustainable enterprise.

Blog Archive


Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Will Trees as your Legacy

So many people wonder as they get older, what difference did I make, will I be remembered, what are the things that I made happen, what are the things that happened to me, how can I help my family when ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals.

Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.

We connect with active individuals, artists and businesses through the ethos of giving back for a sustainable future.

We offer multiple ways for organisations and individuals to collaborate and develop sustainable impacts through partnerships.

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Will Trees as your Legacy

So many people wonder as they get older, what difference did I make, will I be remembered, what are the things that I made happen, what are the things that happened to me, how can I help my family when ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.
To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers and the sea: soaking into the soil is how it reaches the water table, our freshwater reserves.

For the water table to be topped up, the soil must be aerated and porous and tree roots do that. Otherwise, the water will be “lost” and just pours away into streams and rivers, creating silt and into the sea or simply lost to evaporation.

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Will Trees as your Legacy

So many people wonder as they get older, what difference did I make, will I be remembered, what are the things that I made happen, what are the things that happened to me, how can I help my family when ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth.


Our operations are a hybrid of digital and hands-on activities with tangible results and service availability across the globe. We use the natural infrastructure of woodlands to create an impactful business.

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Will Trees as your Legacy

So many people wonder as they get older, what difference did I make, will I be remembered, what are the things that I made happen, what are the things that happened to me, how can I help my family when ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.
We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil in nature. Planting trees heals the heart and the planet.

“The Irish Trees” is a way of giving back from the heart, creating a legacy of belonging to our heritage, our land and sharing moments of immersing in nature, which is good for our hearts and minds.

As a way giving back to people, Irish Trees donate to Irish Hospice Foundation, LauraLynn Ireland’s Children’s Hospice and Féileacáin, and the Stillbirth and Neonatal Death Association of Ireland

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Will Trees as your Legacy

So many people wonder as they get older, what difference did I make, will I be remembered, what are the things that I made happen, what are the things that happened to me, how can I help my family when ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding.

So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change.

Some businesses look at this as the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals become their goals. Other do it with an increasing sense of Corporate social responsibility, others do it just because it is the right thing to do.

There are many free Calculators, and we have inserted a few links below.

But before we send you off to another website, it may be useful to get your head around what this all means.

As an individual reading this, you have a carbon footprint, it is nearly unavoidable. Unless you are living off grid and eating by foraging alone with no fire.

Well businesses produce a carbon footprint from the greenhouse gases they generate through facilities operations, web servers, every email that is sent, employee travel, supply chain activities, packaging, sending post, receiving post or goods and even running the computer  or phone you are reading this on.

By using a business carbon footprint calculator, you can spot the main carbon emitters that are created by your business, and then work to decrease the environmental damage by both reducing emissions or offsetting them through carbon credits or simply planting trees.

Business Activities That Make Carbon Emissions

Whether you offer services, goods, or products, or build houses or drive a taxi or just work online at home. The main emitters for most businesses are:

  • Energy: Energy is the largest emitter of greenhouse gas for businesses.
  • Office Facilities: This refers to all of the structural space used by your business including warehouses, public-facing offices, labs, etc. These structures tend to account for most of a business’ carbon emissions because they require energy, water, and gas to function. For instance, a business with just 2,500 square feet of facilities will, on average, produce 25 tonnes of carbon emissions each year (including employees, energy costs, etc.). Okay some sustainable designs in modern building are better, but most buildings still generate a large amount of emissions.

  • Employee Travel and Product Shipping: This includes all travel that is done for business purposes, including just getting to work, as well as the carbon emissions produced by deliveries to or from your business whether postal, courier or container. Air travel for business meetings and purposes is another component of a business’ carbon footprint, and land or sea-based transport of goods and products are tough on the planet.

  • Capital Expenditures: Like all spending, purchasing desk tops, stationery, company vehicles, equipment, machinery and other long term purchases that will be used for the business all create their own eco-footprint.

  • Operational Expenses and Supply Chain Activities: The materials used in the business, wages, and all other operational expenses are included in the business carbon footprint as well.

All businesses have these carbon costs but by using a free business carbon footprint calculator, you can determine the emissions generated by your company, and gain the knowledge necessary to make meaningful advancements towards a more sustainable and environmentally friendly business model.

Using a Free Carbon Footprint Calculator for Business to Measure the Footprint of Your Company

The best way to begin to reduce your company’s emissions is by measuring the Carbon Footprint of your company. This can easily be accomplished by inputting data from your company into a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions calculator, like the one above. Because the information is calibrated using various sources, it will provide you with an estimation of your business’ GHG emissions. But, the more data you enter increases the accuracy.

To get started, follow these steps:

  1. Begin by entering the type of business you operate, and the industry sector. <br><br>
  2. Include the number of employees as well as how many facilities are included in the business. Facilities and employees play a large role in the accuracy of a business carbon footprint calculator. <br><br>
  3. Collect and enter data about travel activities, Square footage of business space etc<br><br>
  1. Enter your capital and operating expenditures. , labour, materials, supply chain activities and other operational expenses. <br><br>
  2. Make sure to include your electricity and other energy costs. The easiest way to do this is by checking electricity and gas and vehicle fuel bills from the past year. <br><br>
  3. Waste generates greenhouse gas emissions, particularly methane. <br><br>
  1. Organize all of this information before getting started so you can quickly refer to it while inputting information into a business carbon footprint calculator. <br><br>

Once you have all the necessary data, you should select a business footprint calculator. There are many carbon footprint calculators on the internet, but most are designed to calculate the footprint of an individual. A company’s carbon footprint, however, requires a different sort of calculator.

Because business types vary greatly and different industries generate more carbon emissions than others, look for a calculator that uses the latest data and includes many industry and business types.

One carbon footprint calculator for small businesses or low emitter organisations is the Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator published by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

 It’s readily available on their website and is packaged as an Excel file that you can then input your data into during a specific data session.

However, this “simplified” version is a lot like filling out information for Revenue, it can be confusing.

Some immediate opportunities to reduce your company’s eco footprint include:

  • Changing how you ship your products.
  • Using power installations / metres to limit wasted electricity, solar panels etc
  • Introducing climate control systems that turn off systems where no one is working
  • Upgrading appliances and equipment, or improving maintenance schedules to prevent power drains
  • Implementing a recycling program and other waste reduction strategies
  • Going the extra mile and  planting trees for business

How a Business can take immediate action

Meaningful reductions of your company’s carbon footprint take time, but Tree Planting programs, especially those that plant and protect native trees and eco systems, offer a great solution.

 You just have to be careful to make sure that the tree planting offset program is actually replacing native species and restoring natural ecosystems that will be protected for the long haul, not simply a few decades. IE Native species that will not be harvested at a later date like the Tree planting at Dunsany through IrishTrees.ie

Creating a company that is sustainable and eco-friendly isn’t easy, but consumers are responding to and choosing sustainable businesses that protect the environment.

If and when you have the capacity to measure your Businesses Carbon footprint  getting started simply requires measuring your company’s emissions with a carbon footprint calculator and then relentlessly focussing on actions to reduce energy and waste that define your company’s impact on the planet.

But be aware that many Carbon offsets prevent future emissions from occurring, but not all carbon offsets achieve carbon removal. For example, offsetting with a windfarm will reduce energy used to create electricity, but will not remove any carbon from the atmosphere.

In the meantime a simple action to take a step forward is to consider planting trees  on behalf of your business, your customers, per order, per project, per day, per month and start making a positive and tangible difference..NOW!

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Will Trees as your Legacy

So many people wonder as they get older, what difference did I make, will I be remembered, what are the things that I made happen, what are the things that happened to me, how can I help my family when ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air.

Fact – Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) from our atmosphere.

In simple terms, trees use carbon dioxide to grow, tree take the CO2 and transform it into twigs, branches, limbs and trucks and continue to store that carbon until they die and decompose.

Alternatively if a tree is cut down and used for firewood CO2 is released back into the environment.

So, A tree living and growing for hundreds of year will continue to take carbon dioxide from the air.

A rough estimate of the amount of carbon dioxide take from the air over its lifetime if 5 metric tonnes of CO2, hard to imagine what that looks like isn’t it?

Well maybe this will help, imagine a hot air balloon fully inflated with CO2 – that would represent about 1 tonne of CO2. So a mature tree will have absorbed the equivalent of 5 hot air balloons of carbon dioxide over its lifetime. Thats impressive, But…. and it is a big but, if you take all the emissions from Ireland and divide that by our population it would equate to 13 tonnes of CO2 emitted each year, per person – yeah per person!!!

13 tonnes of CO2 equates to about 200 bags of coal being burned!?! …or 36 barrels of oil!?!

So let’s say you subscribe for 12 trees a year -120 trees in 10 years, so over the next 50 years you will have made the following happen:

It is also worth recognising that supporting the Rewilding and planting at Dunsany helps protect the already 500 acres of woodland removing 565 tonnes of carbon dioxide each and every year – 28,500 Tonnes over 50 years.

Produced 35 Tonnes of Oxygen – Think 35 happy balloons

Provided enough oxygen for 38,000 to breathe

Stored 13 tonnes of carbon

Stopped 700,000 gallons of water from evaporating

Cooling the planet to the equivalent impact of running 7 air conditioners on full tilt for 10 years with no energy consumption as the trees dont need petrol or electricity!!

So this is where it gets tricky –

‘So how many trees do I need to plant to negate my impact on the environment’

Answer : ‘As many as you can manage… and reduce your consumption.’

‘No, but really what is the minimum?’

Answer ‘It is a lengthy calculation as the rate of carbon sequestration depends on the growth characteristics of the tree species, the density of its wood, the conditions for growth, and the planting stage of the tree.

The strongest growth is probably in the younger stages of tree growth, between 10 to 50 years, but we have to start somewhere.’

‘Anyway, What is the number?’

Answer

‘You will be a little surprised but each of us would have to plant about 500 trees to fully offset our emissions. Yeah 500 minimum. Part of the CO2 challenge is about planting trees, while at the same time reducing our consumption of goods, of using less fuel for transport and heat etc.’

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Will Trees as your Legacy

So many people wonder as they get older, what difference did I make, will I be remembered, what are the things that I made happen, what are the things that happened to me, how can I help my family when ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference – Tree the difference – see the difference

Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe’s largest rewilding project at Dunsany Nature reserve in County Meath – 750 acres given back to nature by Lord Dunsany.

When you decide to plant a Tree for Nature, we simply email our thanks with a simple digital tree planting Certificate,( if you dont want a certificate just write ‘No Need’ at checkout) and we commit to planting your tree during our planting days, you will also become a subscriber to our Rewilding newsletter, and you will receive updates and video updates by email across the seasons.

We also offer monthly tree planting subscriptions for those that want an ongoing commitment to Tree planting, including planting days at Dunsany Castle and Nature Reserve.

If you have come this far, you have probably decided that you want to do your bit for the planet, not just by reducing waste and buying less, and conserving fuel, but also by investing in Nature, building habitat and eco systems, and that means giving the planet a future.

If you don’t have time but want to just Plant a tree, skip to the bottom of the page.

If you want to know how you are going to help by just planting one tree… read more.

Ireland currently has the best climate for growing trees, yet just 2% of our landmass has broadleaf deciduous trees.

We have less trees than nearly every other European country, however we have better growing conditions than most?

Conifers and evergreen plantations have their place, really just for the fast growth of timber. We need timber too, for the many wooden products we need, from wooden spoons, to roof beams, to furniture, to fuel.

But Conifer plantations simply don’t create a habitat.

In simple terms, eco systems are basically food chains.

Hardly any native insects can live in an evergreen plantation, the under-canopy is too dark and dry to sustain anything else.

As there are no broad leaves, there are few insects, few spiders, which means fewer birds, if any, can scratch out a living. Listen the next time you are in an evergreen forest – no birds!

Should a bird visit, it simply won’t come back, as time is energy for a bird.

Small mammals won’t make a living there either as there is no leaf litter, which means hardly any fungus, it’s too dry and besides there is nothing there to decompose, as there are no leaves, so no insects, no caterpillars, no berries, no nuts, no rodents, no hedgehogs, no small birds, no rabbits, there is nothing there that can sustain nature, plantations are wood growing machines.

Broadleaf native deciduous woodlands on the other hand, begin the cycle that creates the habitat that nature needs, trees take carbon from the sky, and in simple terms, coverts it into wood. This means it traps the carbon until it dies.

But trees grow leaves, Irish Insects need Native Irish Trees as their digestive systems have evolved to eat particular species, if there are small insects there will be big inserts, if the caterpillar can eat the leaf, the bird can eat the caterpillar and feed its chicks, so they will nest, the smaller bird can sustain the hawk.

The deer will seek out undergrowth, foraging and stomping acorns into the ground, if there is light the oak will grow, the roots will intertwine between other trees, making a strong storm tolerant root system. Fallen leaves will create damp habitat to slow heavy rain and purify the water and protect the soil, fungi will help decompose the fallen leaves to feed the soil.

Small undergrowth plants will flourish in the shade of bigger trees, in time, what was a grass field, will become a perfect home of thousands of creatures as the trees grow they will continue to help the absorption of Carbon and together trees will work at protecting each other from storms and disease.

Grass doesn’t feed an ecosystem, it is hardly eaten by any insects and aggressively competes against trees stealing all root resources and water that a young tree needs.

So when you plant one tree very little will happen, but and this is the key… when everybody decides to plant one tree, a woodland will be created that will naturally create an abundance of life.

So, Plant that tree.

We have 750 acres to Rewild at Dunsany, it needs trees, it will take time, but it will be protected, as it has been for the last 950 years.

You can be part of Europe’s largest private rewilding project and that is a legacy to the Earth.

If you want to see more about the Dunsany Rewilding project just click here.

If after reading this you want to subscribe to our Tree planting and become a Dunsany Patron just go back a page and click on the option that appeals to you most.

If at any stage in the future you decide you can do more just let us know.

Be the difference, tree the difference, see the difference – Click here to plant a Tree.

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Will Trees as your Legacy

So many people wonder as they get older, what difference did I make, will I be remembered, what are the things that I made happen, what are the things that happened to me, how can I help my family when ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate their life, or offer practical support to the grieving family, there are many options when choosing gifts for someone who has lost a loved one.

In this article, you’ll find some ideas for thoughtful sympathy gifts and bereavement gifts, as well as some tips to help you decide what to give and when.

What makes a good sympathy gift?

Everyone approaches grief differently, so it’s important to go for a more personal approach and choose a sympathy gift that reflects both the recipient and the person they have lost. Whatever you give, make sure to accompany it with a written card expressing your condolences, sharing a memory of the deceased, and offering support.

Here are a few different bereavement gift ideas to help .

Thoughtful sympathy gifts

Tailoring your gift is a thoughtful way to express your sympathy and ideally personalize it as much as you can.

Personalized sympathy gifts

A personalized Condolence gift focuses on the deceased and helps to keep their memory alive. A Memorial Tree, A Memorial tree with an embedded Donation to a related Charity, photo frames, and jewelry inscribed with the person’s name, photo, and the date of their birth and death are a lovely way for the bereaved to keep that special person close to them.

Practical sympathy gifts

The family will be balancing their emotions dealing with legal proceedings and funeral arrangements, the bereaved family may be struggling to keep on top of things. Even if it doesn’t feel particularly special, a delivery of fresh fruit and vegetables, a freezer full of home-cooked meals, or even a basket of essential household items is sure to be appreciated. But remember to also be around / be in contact when things settle down.

Sympathy gifts for the bereaved

When a loved one dies the family and those nearest to the loss, may feel it is inappropriate to spend time enjoying themselves. Fine wine and chocolates or a mini break or day out with friends are wonderful gifts that even if a little further down the road, will still be appreciated even if offered and not yet accepted.

Classic bereavement gifts

If you’re not sure what to get, particularly if you didn’t know the deceased or their family very well, you can always fall back on the classic sympathy gift ideas, a Tree, Plants, Flowers, photo frames, jewellery, candles, and gift baskets are all sure to be well received and appreciated.

The etiquette of bereavement gifting

Giving a sympathy gift can sometimes feel awkward – or you may worry about causing fresh upset for the bereaved during an emotional time. Many don’t know what to say, don’t know what to do, but it is important to continue to talk about the person lost and not avoid the subject, that in itself can cause more upset. When someone dies, it’s important to be respectful but as long as your gift comes from a warm heart it will help and always be remembered.

However, following the etiquette behind sympathy gifting is always a good idea.

Is it appropriate to give Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts?

Receiving a gift in a time of mourning can be comforting, the bereaved will be genuinely grateful for the gesture. However, if giving a gift feels uncomfortable for any reason, you can’t go wrong by arranging the planting of a tree and sending the Tree planting Certificate with a simple card that may say. ‘Just to let you know i/ we are thinking about you.’ That can mean a lot!

When should you send a sympathy gift?

It’s best to send your gift as soon as possible after learning about the death, preferably within a couple of weeks, at the one-month anniversary, on the annual anniversary etc, If you’d like to give them something more personal that will take longer to organize, send a card straight away to let them know they are in your thoughts. What to write can be difficult, so maybe something short yet Personal. Our website Irishurns and our website Irish trees both offer some appropriate messages that might inspire you so click here.

Who should you send a sympathy gift to?

Sympathy gifts are usually sent to the deceased’s spouse or an immediate family member. If a friend has lost a loved one, sending them a personal gift is absolutely fine and a great way to ensure that you give them something personalized. However, if there is a death in your family and there are many people mourning the loss, a gesture such as planting a tree in the deceased’s name or donating to their favourite charity or with Irish Trees you can do both as well as the tree planting Certificate being accompanied by a handwritten Condolence, on a handmade card.

Choosing thoughtful bereavement gift ideas for someone who has lost a loved one.

It can be hard to know what to buy for a friend or relative who has lost someone. We’ve put together a list of thoughtful bereavement gift ideas to help you choose the right item to send your condolences and honour the memory of a special person.

Memorial Tree Planting

Healing the heart and the planet. A gesture that will be appreciated now but remembered forever. It is probably the most enduring act, and an act that will last a lifetime.

Food hamper

Whether you purchase a pre-made hamper online or put together a selection of their favourite food, drinks, and snacks yourself, this gift is sure to be appreciated.

Flowers

Flowers are often the first thing that comes to mind when people think of a sympathy gift. They brighten up a room and offer a gentle reminder of the beauty of life but families often get too many or ask that flowers are restricted to family only. The other drawback is that they do fade and die and that may not be the experience they need. So perhaps a plant or a Tree for their garden?

Care package

A care package is a great way to remind someone that they are loved and to support them through their grief. Scented candles, calming teas, poetry books, and comfort food like chocolate and biscuits are just a few of the items that you might include in a sympathy care package.

Personalised gift – Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts

Most types of gifts can be personalised in some way, making them even more special. This shows that your gift is from the heart, and isn’t simply something generic that was bought last minute. The Planting of a memorial tree, Jewellery, photo frames, and blankets/ Foxford rugs are just a few bereavement gift ideas that can be easily personalised.

Picture collage

A picture collage is a beautiful way to remember a special person. Choose photos from throughout their lifetime, and make sure to include their friends and family this will be welcome and appreciated and it will help you the giver comes to terms with the loss too.

Keepsake box

A keepsake box can be a special place to gather important mementos, keeping them safe and making it easy to look through when they feel the need.

Sympathy card

If none of these gifts feel right, or you can’t afford to give something more, a sympathy card will always be welcomed. You might like to include a special memory of the deceased, a poem or quote, or simply offer your condolences during a difficult time. Sometimes it is nice note to have the preprinted “With Sympathy” on the front but rather a simple card where you write the message from the heart.

I do hope this helps when you feel you must do something but don’t know what to do.

But the best of all gifts, is simply ongoing love and support!

Blog Archive


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Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. There are around 500 acres of old forest as the lands have been protected for nearly 950 years. We explain why Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie is a perfect collaboration.

Rewilding with irish trees at Dunsany Castle and Estate
Rewilding with Irish trees at Dunsany Castle and Estate

IrishTrees.ie have collaborated with the Earl of Dunsany, Randal Plunkett, to accelerate Tree reforestation and Tree afforestation with the help of patron subscribers helping the Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie.

Patrons contribute either once off or on a subscription basis and are invited to come along and plant trees with Randal and IrishTrees.ie during the main winter planting seasons.

The soil is fertile, so the land not forested or being rewilded is used to grow crops, the income from agriculture supports the estate, along with the income from the film production facilities based here but nature isn’t free and contributing to the planting of more trees will mean that woods can be reconnected to create interconnecting habitats.

Already wildlife is flourishing, from foxes, badgers and otters to owls, red deer and various birds of prey.

Thousands of insects from dragonflies, to honey bees, enjoy the reserve and no animals are farmed at the estate.

Randal is passionate about the rewilding cause and while rewilding by its own name does most of the work, trees do need to be planted and maintained until they develop beyond saplings so they can compete against grasses and survive the foraging efforts of deer.

Irish Trees offers people a Tree planting service to celebrate life and Life moments inclusing the planting of trees to celebrate a birth and trees that act a thoughful gesture to memorialise those we have lost.

Irish Trees have won a number of National awards for their Tree planting service and were runners-up in the 2022 Bord na Mona sponsored GREEN awards. They continue to receive 5-star rating on Trustpilot where so many senders and recipients of Trees for various occasions praise what they do and how they do it. The founder – Bob Hamilton explains how he and Randal came to work together.

Bob CEO Irish trees
Bob Hamilton – Founder of Irish trees

” It was a happy coincidence really, I had been looking for the perfect collaboration for some time and I was asked by a Facilitator in a Development programme to define my perfect collaborator, I said …somebody with a lot of land, somebody who is passionate about Trees and the environment, somebody that takes action, somebody with credibility, somebody who is commercial, as nature isn’t free as it takes time and money to develop and sustain the work. Then I got really picky and added…and ideally in North County Dublin or South Meath? And guess what… She knew Randal ( South Meath) and she arranged an introduction, Randal and I share many values in life, we are aligned and very excited about what we can do together, but we can’t do it without the help of others with similar values and beliefs.”

Randal said ” Bob has a passion for nature but he also has business acumen, he is a man of action who is happy to get his hands dirty and so am I, Bob is about integrity, and that is paramount to me. I will only work with people that share my values, what Bob has done with Irish Trees is amazing, and I know that together we can accelerate habitat development with the support of like-minded people. People that don’t just talk about making a difference, but people that actually take action and plant trees on the land, plant trees in Ireland, and want to create a legacy beyond our own lives. Rewilding with Dunsany Castle and Nature Reserve and IrishTrees.ie just makes sense.

The Planet is in crisis and there will be those that can proudly say that they did their part, and there will be those that just thought about doing something, but didn’t. It is a matter of choice, so if you can’t plant 100 trees in your garden, plant 100 trees, indeed plant 1000 trees with us.”

Patrons of Dunsany can plant trees in Ireland by either subscribing monthly or by choosing to make a once of contribution at https://irishtree.ie

Subscription patrons will be invited to attend planting dates and get to meet both Randal and Bob at the Castle before heading into the woods and fields to plant trees.

Family planting days will also be arranged where parents who subscribe, can come along and plant trees with their children to generate a connection with nature, create memories, and show how committed families can make a positive impact on the environment. There will be other fun activities arranged including forest treasure hunts, Randal and Bob want as many people as possible involved in the Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees. Check out how to support this exciting development at https://irishtrees.ie

Randal Plunkett – Dunsany

Blog Archive


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Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Will Trees as your Legacy

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Will Trees as your Legacy

So many people wonder as they get older, what difference did I make, will I be remembered, what are the things that I made happen, what are the things that happened to me, how can I help my family when I am gone, how can I ensure that the family will be proud of what I have done, these, and so many more questions. Planting a tree leaves lasting gift for generations to come, plant a forest and save the planet too.

Loving trees

A Cuban philosopher said that everyone ought to do 3 things before they die: “Plant a tree, write a book, have a child.” He said…I have planted a number of trees in my life, so at age 72, I better get busy on the other two.

Tree on a book to symbolise how to will trees
Tree on a book to symbolise how to will trees

Many older people have contacted Irish Trees and enquired about how they might organize tree planting either before or after their demise.

Some have even asked about how you go about leaving money to plant trees / Will Trees, after they are gone.

It isn’t complicated. In your Will, simply state, that you want to Will Trees, and state how much you want to allocate to tree planting, and ideally where you want to plant the trees ( eg- Ireland) that they be a particular species, or perhaps a mix of e.g. native Irish trees.

Think about adding Tree planting as a legacy in your will – whatever the loaction – every tree makes a difference

To make it easier for your Executor, perhaps you can research who you would like to do this, on your behalf, in your chosen location – In Ireland we can help plant trees in our rewilding location at Dunsany Castle and Estate where 750 acres are gradually being rewilded to nature, and all the creations and plants that need that protection and habitat are thriving.

Rewilding with irish trees at Dunsany Castle and Estate
Rewilding with irish trees at Dunsany Castle and Estate

If I can help and perhaps discuss your thoughts and wishes or simply offer advice, just contact me – email bob@irishtrees.ie

We plan on planting thousands of native Irish trees across the fields to join the woods back together and build naturally wild habitat

Blog Archive


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Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

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Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

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You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

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Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

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Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

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The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Irish Love Story – Celtic Legends of Romance

Planting a native Irish tree in honour of a loved one is a deeply meaningful and heartfelt gesture. Whether it be a memorial tree or an anniversary tree, there are few better ways of expressing your love.

Incidentally, when it comes to tales of love and romance, the Irish are particularly well-versed. Ireland’s mythology of ill-fated, star-crossed lovers is rich and vast. The Irish have a long tradition of epic love stories that are breathtakingly romantic and heartbreakingly tragic in equal measure. These love stories have been crafted with the singularly Irish sensibility of poetic sorrow and poignant beauty, many serving as inspiration for legions of love stories told throughout history.

We have compiled a collection of just some of the most famous Celtic myths and legends concerning love and loss that have been passed down from generation to generation in Ireland for centuries.

Clíodhna and Ciabhán

According to ancient Irish mythology, Clíodhna was the Queen of the Banshees and the Goddess of Love and Beauty. A woman of staggering beauty, she was a member of the Tuath Dé Danann, an ancient family and supernatural race of God-like beings with great powers. The Tuath Dé Danann lived in a magical otherworld which presided over Ireland, but would occasionally descend and make contact with humans and the mortal world.

Clíodhna resided on the island of Tír Tairngire, also known as the Land of Promise. There she was forever surrounded by three mystical birds who fed from the apples of a magical tree and, as a consequence, had the ability to cure any mortal ailment. Their birdsong could lull any ill human who heard it into a deep sleep. When the human awoke, whatever malady they had been afflicted with was miraculously cured.

But it was the song of another which would prove to be her undoing.

Clíodhna fell hopelessly in love with a mortal from Ireland named Ciabhán and, so great was their love, she chose to leave the magical realm of Tír Tairngire and live a mortal life in the human realm. This was a considerable sacrifice on her part, but to many of her fellow gods and goddesses, it was a grave affront.

As she travelled across the ocean to be with her mortal lover, she stopped to rest for the night in the harbour of Glandore. It was here that the other gods exacted their revenge and inflicted a cruel punishment upon Clíodhna, for her selfish and disrespectful transgression.

Manannán Mac Lir, the God of the Sea, began to play a beautiful song which lulled Clíodhna into a deep sleep and then summoned a powerful wave. While still sleeping peacefully by the oceanside, Clíodhna was swept out to sea by the merciless wave and drowned, never to reach her lover.

To this day, whenever a particularly strong or forceful wave crashes down on Glandore harbour in County Cork, it is called ‘Clíodhna’s Wave’.

Fionn and Sadhbh

Fionn Mac Cumhaill was the leader of the Fianna, a heroic band of fearless hunter-warriors who embarked on various quests of valour and honour. One day, Fionn was out hunting when he suddenly came across a beautiful doe in a sunlit clearing. Fionn’s magical hounds, Bran and Sceólang, who were humans enchanted into animal form, immediately saw that this was no regular doe. The doe was, in fact, a woman named Sadhbh transformed by dark magic.

Sadhbh was the daughter of Bodb Derg, the King of the Tuath Dé Danann. She had refused the marriage proposal of an evil druid named Fear Doirich (a name which translates as ‘The Dark Man’). Humiliated by her rejection, he cursed her to take the form of a doe and left her to be brutally killed by hunting hounds. However, a servant of Fear Doirich took pity on her and told her that if she were to ever step foot in the land of the Fianna, the spell would be broken.

Sure enough, as soon as Fionn and his mystical hounds led Sadhbh back to their homeland, the curse was shattered. Sadhbh became a beautiful young woman once more and Fionn immediately fell madly in love with the daughter of the King of the Gods. They married swiftly and not long after, Sadhbh was expecting a child. As long as Sadhbh remained within the land of the Fianna, she would be safe and protected. But evil forces were drawing closer and their happiness was not to last.

While Sadhbh was still awaiting the birth of their child, Fionn and his warriors were called away to do battle. After several days’ absence, Sadhbh finally saw Fionn returning home in the faraway distance. Overjoyed, she ran to greet him, only realising the grave mistake she had made when it was too late. As soon as she crossed the threshold of the Fianna’s land, the image of her husband disappeared, revealing the Fear Doirich and his magical disguise.

The Fear Doirich had heard of how Sadhbh had once again made a fool of him by undoing his magic, and he sought vengeance. He once more transformed her into a doe, only this time the spell could not be broken. He then set a pack of wild, rabid dogs on her and Sadhbh fled into the forest, never to be seen again.

The heartbroken Fionn spent many years desperately searching for his lost wife, but she was nowhere to be found. Then, one day, he came across a small fawn, alone and lost, in a sunlit clearing. Fionn instinctively knew that this was his child and when he brought it back home, the fawn instantly transformed into a young boy. Most fittingly, the boy was given the name of Oisín, the meaning of which is ‘little deer’.

Deirdre and Naoise (Deirdre of the Sorrows)

Countless centuries ago, there lived a powerful man named Conchubar mac Nessa, the King of Ulster. The King had a storyteller and a druid, both men being highly valued and respected members of his court. But one day, the druid foretold that the storyteller would have a daughter who would grow up to be so beautiful that men would go to war over her and much blood would be spilt.

When the storyteller and his wife did have a child, who they named Deirdre, the King’s warriors wanted the child killed. But the king had other plans. He decided that the child would be raised in isolation deep in the forest, where she could cause no harm and no harm could come to her. Then, when she came of age, the king would take this beautiful young woman to be his bride.

And so, the young girl grew up alone in the solitude of the woods, growing ever more beautiful and waiting for the king to come and marry her. However, one day Deirdre was suddenly discovered in her hiding place in the woods by Naoise, a young and handsome warrior in the King’s court. The two fell in love and decided to flee together to Scotland, where they lived for a brief spell in happiness and peace.

But the King, incandescent with rage, was not to be humiliated in such a manner. He would not rest until he had his revenge and immediately sent his warriors to track down the young couple. Before long, the lovers’ new life together was cruelly and savagely cut short. As soon as they were found, Naoise was killed by a flying dagger and the devastated Deirdre was captured and returned to her infuriated fiancé.

Deirdre had no choice but to marry the vindictive king, but the hatred she felt for him only burned more intensely with every passing day. After a year of marriage, the king was further incensed by the obvious resentment and contempt Deirdre had for him. Seeking a means of ruthless punishment, the King asked Deirdre if there was anyone whom she hated more than him. Immediately, she gave the name of the man whose dagger had cut down her beloved Naoise.

With gleeful spite, the king announced that Deirdre was to divorce him and marry the man who murdered Naoise instead. While being escorted to her wedding with the man who had killed her one true love, Deirdre was overcome with dread and despair at the prospect of her new life. She threw herself from the chariot in which they journeyed and dashed her head upon a rock, freeing herself from an impending life of unending misery. In doing so, she was reunited with her darling Naoise and forever became known as ‘Deirdre of the Sorrows’.

Irish Trees – Anniversary Tree Gift

The Irish certainly appear to have a distinct perspective when it comes to tales of love, one that seems to be innately melancholy. Hopefully, your own love story is more strongly favoured by romance than tragedy, unlike these Celtic tales.

You can express your own love for your other half in a uniquely Irish way by planting a native Irish tree in their name. You can plant an Anniversary Gift Tree and have an Irish tree of your choosing grown in honour of your relationship.  All trees are planted on 10 acres of beautiful lakeside woodland in North Co. Dublin and are expertly tended to by our devoted caretakers so they grow to be healthy, strong and everlasting. There is no better symbol to represent a loving and lasting relationship.

You can also have an Irish tree planted for a number of other occasions, such as birthdays, weddings or the birth of a baby. We are happy to plant a tree for any reason you wish. To find out more, browse our options here.

There are few better ways of expressing your love for someone dear to you than the planting of a native Irish tree.

Article written by Nicholas Collender.

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

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You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

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The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

The Tree of Life – An Ancient Celtic Symbol

The Tree of Life has appeared in countless cultures, religions and mythologies all over the world and throughout history. Clearly, the idea of a mystical tree which embodies the essence of life is not unique to any one civilization.

Almost every faith has its own version of the Tree of Life, including Christianity, Buddhism, Islam, Judaism and Hinduism. The Tree of Life symbol even appears on Ancient Egyptian tomb carvings, possibly predating any other culture. However, the Tree of Life is particularly prominent in Celtic tradition and is one of the most enduring and meaningful Celtic symbols.

Trees were pivotal to Celtic life and played an important role in the structure of Celtic society and beliefs. Firstly, the trees of Ireland served a number of invaluable practical purposes. Trees were a natural, abundant source of shelter, food and medicine, and their wood was extensively used for building, weaponry and to create fires for warmth. Native Irish trees were clearly essential to Celtic life and were held in such high regard that they were considered sacred.

It was believed that trees served a significant spiritual purpose and acted as a gateway or portal between this world and the next. The Celts believed that the trees of Ireland held the spirits of their ancestors and that different types of trees had different magical powers that could aid them in times of hardship and adversity.

Tree of Life illustration

Tribes and druids would often hold ceremonies and gatherings under trees that were seen as especially hallowed. Under the sprawling coverage of a vast, tremendous tree, they would appoint chieftains in political procedures or perform elaborate rituals to appease the gods.

The Tree of Life was seen as a symbol of nature’s immense forces coming together and intertwining to create balance and harmony in the world. It was seen as a representation of strength, durability, protection, knowledge, experience and wisdom.

Ultimately, the Tree of Life was a perfectly balanced combination of all the forces necessary to maintain and enrich life on Earth. The entwined branches and roots symbolise how all living things are irrevocably interconnected and bound together, dependent on one another for survival.

The symbol is depicted as an Oak tree, as this tree was the largest, strongest and longest-living of all trees. The Oak tree would often attract lightning due to its staggering size and height. The Celts perceived this as a sign from the gods and worshipped the Oak as the most sacred tree of all the native Irish trees.

The Celtic word for Oak is daur, which is the origin of the word door. This reinforces the Celtic idea that native Irish trees were doorways to other worlds. Some believed that if you fell asleep under an Oak tree, you might awake in another world.

The ancient Irish term for the Tree of Life was Crann Bethadh, which literally translates as ‘The Feeding Tree’. If the Celts ever had to clear land in order to build new settlements, they would plant an Oak tree in the centre of the clearing in order to honour the Tree of Life and ensure prosperity.

If Celtic tribes were ever at war with one another, they believed that cutting down their enemies’ Crann Bethadh tree was a devastating blow to their defences that would render them powerless and vulnerable to attack. During warfare, cutting down such a tree belonging to an adversary was seen as a major victory.

Celtic Symbol of the Tree of Life

The perfect symmetry of the roots and branches of the Tree of Life was also given great meaning by the Celts. The branches spread freely in the open air, reaching for the sky above, while the roots unfurled and burrowed underground, reaching deep down into the earth.

This is symbolic of the connection between heaven and earth, mind and body, the physical and the spiritual. In this way, the Tree of Life also represents the incessant cycle of life and the gift of rebirth. Like many other Celtic symbols, the Tree of Life is comprised of a Celtic knot. This illustrates how the Tree of Life is eternal, without beginning or end.

Today, the Tree of Life is an extremely popular design or symbol, particularly for those of Irish heritage. It is used to decorate and adorn a number of items from jewellery to various types of containers, and is even commonly used as a tattoo.

Due to its potent symbolism, the Tree of Life is the perfect design to feature on a Celtic cremation urn. Handcrafted urns engraved with the ancient Celtic symbol can be found at Irish Urns and make the perfect resting place for anyone with Irish ancestry.

It is possible to continue the Celtic tradition of the Tree of Life today and have your own Oak tree (or any native Irish tree) planted in the Irish countryside. You can have a tree planted for any conceivable reason, whether it be for a birthday, an anniversary, a wedding, or any other occasion.

Planting a native Irish tree in honour of someone you love who has passed away is a wonderful and deeply touching tribute. Memorial trees are a perfect way of celebrating and preserving a person’s legacy. You can also plant a tree in memory of someone as a sympathy gift or memorial gift for a friend or family member who has lost a loved one. The memorial tree can be planted in the name of the deceased with an official planting certificate sent to the bereaved afterwards.

For more information on memorial trees and sympathy gifts, please click here.

Planting a native Irish tree in honour of a loved one helps to keep alive the Ancient Celts deep connection with nature.

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Baby Loss condolence and sentiment

Baby loss condolence and sentiment suggestions that you can use or to help with your own inspiration… for just the right message.

These sentiments can be used on our Personalised Tree planting Certificates for The Butterfly tree

The Butterfly Tree planting is arranged, a Planting Certificate is issued and €40 is donated to the Stillbirth and Neonatal Death Association – Féileacáin (Butterfly)

Baby Loss condolence and sentiment

Your time with us was fleeting, our love for you is forever.

On this Earth you lived a moment, in our hearts, you live forever.

I was with you for every second of your life. You will be with me for every second of mine.

Holding you in our hearts until we hold you in heaven.

We held you in our arms briefly, we hold you in our hearts forever.

Too precious for this Earth, too beautiful for this world.

We wanted a baby. We were given an angel.

You were our best few moments.

Flying with angels, dancing on stars.

Your small life was the biggest moment in ours.

The smallest life takes up the biggest room in our heart.

A moment with you inspired an eternity of love.

Here for a heartbeat, loved for a lifetime.

Your heart beats in mine.

If love could have saved you, you would have lived forever.

A moment in time, an eternity in our hearts.

Féileacáin (Butterfly)-Stillbirth and Neonatal Death Association of Ireland – SANDAI – A National charity.

Offering support to those affected by the death of a baby around the time of birth. Féileacáin was formed by a group of bereaved parents to supporting families affected by perinatal loss.

Féileacáin is a volunteer led organisation and receives no funding from central government, relying instead on the support of the community and the families who avail of our services and their friends.

Registered as a charity in 2010 ( CHY – 19635). 

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Does Nature Improve Our Mental Health?

This article originally featured on Bloomingnative.ie.

Think of somewhere where you could feel calm and relaxed. Chances are that you have just imagined yourself in a woodland glade, or a garden space, or even on a sunny beach with palm trees rustling in the wind. 90% of people who are asked that question will always imagine a natural setting as their personal paradise. It’s an ingrained desire for humans to seek out nature or to be gladdened by its existence.

This need to connect to nature is known as biophilia. Literally meaning ‘attracted to life’, biophilia is the theory that human evolution is so tied in with nature and plants, that their absence causes discord within us, leading to poorer health outcomes and impaired mental and social well being.

What happens when we view nature or natural beauty?

“Just living is not enough…one must have sunshine, freedom and a little flower” Hans Cristian Anderson wrote. 150 years later, it seems that Mr Anderson is being proven correct.

Interactions with nature fill people with positive feelings and ‘prosocial’ tendencies. It doesn’t even have to be direct contact with nature. When a group of people were shown a short film about woodlands, they later reported feeling better and happier about the future. They even thought more about their own social responsibilities and less about self-importance and entitlement.

In the real world, these tendencies have been demonstrated in areas that have been regenerated with plants and trees. Areas such as these have recorded fewer anti-social activities. Those who live in these places have reported a renewed sense of social responsibility, neighbourhood civility, and increased cooperation in the community. These changes indicate that biophilia and natural spaces should be playing a large role in urban community design.

Connecting with nature offers an opportunity for mental restoration and has been shown to increase the ability for conducting focused tasks in workplaces. Even a brief walk in a planted area dispels mental fatigue and allows employees to work better when doing work that is mentally taxing. Offices with natural views, or where employees are encouraged to bring their own plants, are more productive and have a lower incidence of self-reported sick days. Even windowless offices were shown to have reduced levels of employee stress when plants were introduced.

At the University of Illinois, scientists looked at the effects of nature on children in school. They found that a short 20-minute walk in a natural park greatly enhanced attention spans in children diagnosed with ADHD. Similar studies in Norway found that pupils were more enthusiastic about going to school and their classrooms when plants were introduced and that illness and complaints such as coughing and irritability were also reduced by as much as 21%.

Connection with nature affects physical health

Nature and plants also help in-hospital recovery times and even play a role in the prevention of illness. A prolific researcher in this area, Roger Ulrich, has demonstrated that patients recovering from illness or operations recover faster when given a view to a natural landscape. This effect also happens when plants are arranged near to windows and natural light in patients rooms. He also found that greenery in a room or a natural area within walking distance reduced stress levels of both staff and patients in hospitals.

Other studies found that the presence of plants induces greater tolerance of pain in patients. Interestingly, flowering plants instil even greater tolerance than non-flowering.

So why do we respond so positively when presented with nature and natural landscapes?

Our evolutionary road has played an important role in how we respond to nature. Before the industrial revolution, the vast majority of humanity lived an agrarian, or agricultural lifestyle. This involved an extremely close relationship with nature and natural life. Indeed, it was essential for survival itself.

Consider that it is only in the last 250 years that we have moved away from 12,000 years of agrarian living. Technological developments in the last two centuries have allowed modern humans to distract and shield themselves from the natural world. Over the past three decades, in particular, we have become more consumed by our technology and less in tune with the natural world. A new approach is necessary to reduce the illnesses and disorders which are increasing in frequency as time moves on. As we abandon nature, we are creating discord within ourselves.

Reconnection with nature is necessary to lessen the impacts of modern life on our mental and physical health. A slight step back from the hectic and demanding world and a reintroduction to the natural is some thing worth considering.

We may be arriving at a turning point, however. The last decade has seen a rise in people making efforts to reconnect with nature. People are noticing more and more, the environmental degradation which has taken place and are working to fix the problems of the past. Projects to restore natural environments have been initiated on a national level with broad support from the general public.

How can we connect with nature?

It is quite simple really!

1. Go for a walk

Look around, listen, take it all in! There is a whole world out there which we have learned to ignore. It buzzes around us, floats overhead, scurries along the highways beneath the long grass. It is there if we choose to see it.

2. Grow a garden

The act of caring for a plant and watching it grow has been shown to increase feelings of self-worth and achievement. A garden is not just beautiful to look at, it is an incredibly rewarding undertaking. It can be used to create a habitat that will encourage even more life to set up home. You don’t need a huge space, even a window blooming with flowers will perform the same function on a smaller scale.

3. Invite nature to come to you

Hang bird feeders close to a window or a place it can be easily seen. Plant pollinator-friendly plants and provide safe nesting places for the pollinators by hanging bee & insect hotels, encouraging these tiny friends to visit and stay. Not only does the act of viewing nature calm the mind, but the quick, darting behaviour of birds and insects helps to sharpen mental acuity and eye coordination.

4. Introduce plants and flowers inside and outside your home or workplace.

Even just one plant has been shown to increase feelings of positivity and wellbeing. It also has the bonus of reducing dust and freshening the air inside.

5. Encourage and inspire others to get involved.

Organise kids activities such as ‘bug hunts’ or scavenger hunts. Share photographs on social media of insects, birds, plants, etc. The act of taking or even just viewing these photographs can help in reducing stress or anxiety.

We have evolved to appreciate and want to connect with all forms of life. Perhaps it is time we organised our social activities to focus more on the natural and less on the technological. There is room to find a balance for both. In the end, we may find that this balance is what is needed to achieve higher life satisfaction.

Article written by Julie Power.

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The Slow Disappearance of Irish Trees

Although Ireland is home to a beautiful landscape and many famous landmarks, traveling around the country may prompt a common question: where are all the native Irish trees?

Ireland is known for many of its attributes, one of them being its trees or lack thereof.

At one point, Ireland had a forest coverage of nearly 80% which is astonishing when compared to the current forest coverage of about 11%, and only 2-3% broadleaf trees.

The average forest coverage in Europe is over 40%. There are two primary reasons for why Ireland has no trees.

The first reason is due to the ever-changing climate. About 20,000 years ago, during the Ice Age, a large amount of Ireland was covered in glaciers. When the Ice Age was brought on, it is likely that no trees in Ireland survived.

However nearly 12,000 years ago temperatures began to warm, and the glaciers melted, resulting in higher sea levels and the ultimate formation of Ireland’s current landscape.

For thousands of years, only hardy trees, such as willows and birches, were able to survive in Ireland due to the climate. Slowly more tree species, including oak and ash, began to grow.

However, the rate of climate change has only increased in recent years which has worsened Ireland’s tree dilemma. Higher temperatures and reduced rainfall have made it increasingly difficult for native Irish trees to survive.

The second reason for Ireland’s deforestation is human activity, or, rather, human destruction, which is undoubtedly primarily responsible for this issue.

Starting about 6,000 years ago, humans in Ireland began clearing land for agriculture and using trees for resources at a pace that depleted forests. Timber was recognized as a highly valuable commodity due to its wide range of uses.

As the population continued to grow, the speed at which forests were cleared accelerated to keep up with demand, as wood was used for a variety of resources such as tools and ships.

Due to the fact that the climate was very wet at the time, the lack of trees resulted in a lack of nutrients in the soil. Bad soil conditions not only made it difficult for trees to survive but made it nearly impossible for tree seedlings to grow.

High volumes of farm animals also restricted tree seedlings from growing.

Over the next few thousand years, as the population continued to rapidly increase and humans continued to use unsustainable habits, the landscape in Ireland became blanketed in dead vegetation.

In recent history, there has been a big push by the Irish to fix the lack of native trees. Most notably, the Irish Government has started a project that aims to plant 440 million trees by the year 2040.

It is essential to plant native Irish trees as these are the trees that will be able to best support Ireland’s ecosystem.

Given the poor status of Ireland’s native trees, gifting an Irish tree to a loved one will not only serve as a heartfelt and ever-lasting present but will also immensely contribute to restoring Ireland’s natural landscape while simultaneously helping to protect the planet. Gifting a native Irish tree is a standout present perfect for any occasion.

Article Researched and Written by Charlotte Morten.

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Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

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Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

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Native Irish Trees – Ireland’s Changing Landscape

Ireland’s landscape has been depleting over the centuries, but it still remains home to a variety of native trees. There are 9 trees that are native to Ireland that are most common. The list of native Irish trees includes: Common Oak, Holly, Hazel, Alder, Whitethorn, Crab-apple, Rowan Mountain Ash, Yew and Sycamore.

While all of these trees were once commonly found across Ireland, the ever-changing climate and destructive human activity have both contributed to a decline in Ireland’s native tree population.

That being said, the national tree of Ireland and formerly the most common tree species native to the country, the Oak, is now rare to come by as very few natural Oak woods are left.

This is primarily due to the overharvesting of Oak trees, particularly Sessile Oak, for its wood since it is visually pleasing and incredibly durable. Oak trees tend to live for 200 to 250 years.

The Oak tree was once so prominent that the Irish used it in the Celtic Tree of Life symbol.

Today, the Oak has been replaced by the Ash tree as the most common native tree found in Ireland. Perhaps one explanation for why Ash trees are so common is because they can grow in a wide range of soils and live for up to 200 to 300 years.

The Silken Thomas Yew is believed to be the oldest tree native to Ireland. Experts have estimated this tree to be nearly 800 years old, which explains its prominence in Irish history.

According to Irish folklore, Silken Thomas sat beneath this tree before surrendering to King Henry VIII. Irish folklore also includes tales of how this tree possesses magical properties.

Many native Irish trees were also considered to be sacred by the ancient Celts. Notably at the top of the list of trees that were sacred to the Celts were Oak and Ash trees. Oak trees symbolized truth, courage, and wisdom while Ash trees signified healing.

Alder trees symbolized the balance between men and women and Crab-apple trees represented youthfulness.

Holly trees were cherished by the ancient Celts for their protective qualities. Many native Irish trees were also the center of Irish folklore and mythology stories.

There are many mixed woodlands throughout Ireland, so learning how to identify native Irish trees is important. To do so, the simplest technique to use is to examine their leaves.

For instance, oak and ash trees tend to be the last trees to get their leaves every spring. Looking at the flowers and seeds on Irish trees can also be helpful as alder, hazel, birch and poplar have catkins before their leaves and blackthorn, hawthorn, and elder have flowers with petals.

Some trees, such as oak and hazel trees, have nuts that fall and spread their seeds. Studying the tree’s bark texture and color, along with the height of the tree, can also be key factors in the identification process.

For example, oak and ash trees both have indented brown bark. Alternatively, there are apps available that are designed to help identify native Irish trees.

Considering the fact that native Irish trees play such an important role in Ireland’s landscape, culture, and history, gifting an Irish tree is the perfect gift to give a loved one for any occasion. Irish Trees provides you with the opportunity to give someone a standout gift that will be everlasting, with an array of eight different native Irish trees to choose from (Common Oak, Holly, Hazel, Alder, Whitethorn, Crab-apple, Rowan Mountain Ash, and Sycamore) for a variety of occasions.

Article Researched and Written by Charlotte Morten.

Blog Archive


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Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

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Tree of Memories – In Partnership with LauraLynn

LauraLynn (Ireland Only Children’s Hospice) and Irish Urns and Memorial Trees have partnered to offer a ‘Tree of Memories’ with an embedded €40 donation to this wonderful charity.

Planting a native Irish tree in memory of someone is a beautiful gesture and cathartic act. It enables us to express our grief and offer comfort in a profound and moving way that goes beyond mere words.

 The gift of a memorial tree can now be made even more heartfelt and unique due to this wonderful collaboration.

Our recent collaboration with LauraLynn means that your loved one can continue to have a deeply positive impact on the lives of many, even after they are gone. When you plant a tree in memory, you can also make a donation to this worthy cause in the name of your lost loved one.

“There is no better tribute to a life than a charitable contribution made to a remarkable organisation. Your Memorial Tree can be both an act of lasting remembrance as well as an act of compassion and generosity.” Bob Hamilton – CEO – Irish Urns and Memorial Trees.

LauraLynn – Ireland’s Only Children’s Hospice

”LauraLynn are honored to partner with Irish Urn’s Memorial Tree initiative this year. Planting a tree in memory of a loved one is a very compassionate act that lasts a lifetime, and we are so grateful that this kind act will also support the work that we do here in Ireland’s only children’s hospice. Creating lasting memories and moments is a huge part of what we do in LauraLynn, making this a lovely way for people to support the specialized care and support which we provide to children with life-limiting conditions and their families across Ireland.” Kerry McLaverty – CEO, LauraLynn

LauraLynn is Ireland’s only children’s hospice. They provide specialised care and supports to children with life-limiting conditions and their families. Their aim is to make the most of short and precious lives and all of their extraordinary work is underpinned by their core values of Compassion, Collaboration and Excellence.

They help to make every day memorable, fun and enjoyable for those in their care and organise special events which give families the opportunity to spend quality time together in a stress-free environment specifically tailored for them. They also provide various forms of support to the family of the child and offer a respite from the responsibility of caring for an ill child.

LauraLynn’s ultimate goal is to provide first-rate, personalised care and specialised services to both child and family in a fun, friendly and compassionate environment. The LauraLynn Model of Care describes the five pillars of children’s hospice care: Direct Care, Family Support, Symptom Management, End-of-Life Care, and Bereavement Support. The aim of this Model of Care is to ensure that the unique needs of each individual child and their family are met and provided for in the best possible way.

How to Order a Tree of Memories and Make a Donation

A ‘Tree of Memories’ can be ordered on either one of our websites, www.irishurns.com and www.irishtrees.ie. You can choose your tree from a range of eight native Irish trees. The tree will then be planted on 10 acres of beautiful lakeside woodland located in North County Dublin, near the small village of Naul. The tree will slowly grow forever in this tranquil setting, surrounded by thousands of bulbs and millions of wildflowers.

A personalised official Planting Certificate (customised at checkout) is both emailed to you and physically posted to your chosen delivery address. Your donation to LauraLynn is included in the price of the tree and specified at checkout. This donation will be acknowledged on the Planting Certificate, but not the exact amount. Once the tree has been planted, it will be expertly tended to by our caretakers so it grows to be strong, healthy and long-lasting.

Next Steps

If you have any questions or wish to speak to someone directly about this service, please email us at bob@irishurns.ie or call 00 353 (0)86 255 8531. You can also visit either our Irish Urns and Memorial Trees website, www.irishurns.com, or our Irish Trees website, www.irishtrees.ie.

About LauraLynn

LauraLynn is Ireland’s only Children’s Hospice providing palliative and hospice care and support for children with life-limiting conditions and their families from all across Ireland. LauraLynn, provides a range of services including, symptom management for children, music and play therapy, psychological support, family and sibling camps, short breaks, Crisis Care and End of Life Care. Care can be availed of in our specialized hospice in Leopardstown, at hospital, in the community, or in the family home, depending on the location and medical needs of the child and the family’s preference. LauraLynn provides vital bereavement supports to families after they have lost a child. LauraLynn also undertakes research into the relatively new area of children’s palliative care. LauraLynn relies primarily on fundraised income and this year alone must generate €5.5 million through fundraised income. Since opening in 2011, LauraLynn has cared for almost 481 children and their families, with 374 children and families currently availing of care & supports.

For further information please visit lauralynn.ie

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

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Greenwashing – The Biggest Threat to the Climate Movement

Consumers today are more informed than ever before. In an age where limitless information is so easily accessible to everybody and anybody, it is growing increasingly difficult for big companies to conceal their practices. While there was once a time when the masses had to blindly accept whatever companies and their advertisements chose to tell them, that naivety has all but vanished with the increasing omnipresence of the internet.

Now, everything a company presents to their audience is scrutinised, questioned and, if found lacking, challenged. This can come with potentially disastrous consequences for the business in question if artifice is exposed. However, if left unchecked, the exploits of big businesses masquerading as environmentally friendly can have far more catastrophic consequences for the fight against climate change.

In today’s world, it is not enough for businesses to simply produce a high-quality product or to satisfy the immediate needs of the customer; they must stand for something.

The dawn of the information age has cast a piercing light on many issues which were previously overlooked or ignored by the majority. This has led to the average purchaser being more aware of social issues, and that same awareness has grown into passionate activism for many, particularly for the young.

The end of the consumer’s ignorance has led to the beginning of companies’ unavoidable culpability.

While many companies have adapted with the times and rose to the occasion, there are those that have only grown more sophisticated with their means of deceit and fraudulence. And this deception may prove to be the biggest and most damaging threat posed to the environment moving forward.

But What Exactly is Greenwashing?

The term greenwashing was first coined in the 1980s. A young undergraduate student named Jay Westerveld was at a hotel resort in Fiji when he noticed signs asking residents to pick up their towels from the beach and to reuse them. The hotel claimed this was in order to help preserve the ocean and its coral reefs.

He was struck by the immense irony of this, as the same hotel resort was expanding its property on land and sea and therefore doing great harm to the local ecosystem and its coral reefs.

It was clear that the only reason the hotel wanted residents to recycle their towels was so they did not have to buy new ones as frequently and could save money.

Sometime later, after graduating college, Westerveld remembered the incident while writing an essay for a magazine in New York. Due to the popularity of the piece, the term officially entered the public lexicon, forever changing the way big companies do business and their relationship with the consumer.

As is clearly demonstrated from the above example, greenwashing is when an organisation misleadingly markets themselves to be more environmentally friendly in their products and practices than they really are.

They may only be less environmentally beneficial than they portray themselves, or they may be causing severe damage to the environment and attempting to obscure it from public view.

Information and knowledge is paramount in the fight against climate change and greenwashing.

Green is the New Black

In an age where climate change is one of the most urgent and pressing issues worldwide, green has become the new black. In order for a company to succeed in today’s world, it is paramount that they are seen as green. They will advertise their greenness on logos and branding, in commercials and special offers. But it is important to know for certain how they are directly contributing to the betterment of the environment.

An unfortunate side effect of the increasingly impassioned calls for immediate action on climate change is that greenwashing is becoming more prevalent. Greenwashing is often achieved through plainly deceptive advertising, false or ambiguous claims and using outdated or distorted data and statistics.

Sometimes, greenwashing can even be unintentional and not necessarily the result of a calculated scheme. Greenwashing can be caused by overly eager or enthusiastic marketing that inadvertently paints an inaccurate or incomplete picture of a company’s environmental undertakings.

Similarly, companies may fail to realise that the standards of environmental friendliness have changed or that the goalpost of new climate change targets have been moved. Nevertheless, the effects are the same and just as damaging.

Former vice president and ardent environmentalist, Al Gore, recently stated that greenwashing was a rapidly rising threat which could derail the fight against climate change. How can consumers effectively contribute to the fight against climate change when some unscrupulous companies are confusing and exploiting them with spurious claims, corrupt misinformation and false promises.

In spite of their best intentions, consumers may unwittingly impede the progress of environmentalism by supporting companies which have misled them. This is why it is essential for the discerning consumer to know and recognise the trademark features of greenwashing.

Greenwashing – How to Spot It and How to Stop It

It isn’t always easy to know what companies are actually minimising their carbon footprint and what companies are spending more time and effort on marketing their alleged green attributes instead of actively being green. Thankfully, however, there are many tell-tale signs that a company may be greenwashing. Here is a list of some indications that a company isn’t doing as much to protect the environment as they would want you to believe.

A lack of evidence or proof: Making a claim about being environmentally friendly but without any hard information, data, statistics or examples to corroborate it. If a company says they are environmentally conscious but fails to illustrate precisely how, it is quite possible they are greenwashing.

Vagueness and ambiguity: Consumers should be wary if a company uses broad or fluffy language in relation to climate change. The use of vague or routine terms, such as ‘eco-friendly’, ‘green’ or ‘sustainable’, and nothing more, could be a cause for suspicion. Avoiding particulars or failing to be specific about their environmental endeavours may mean the company only has the semblance of being eco-friendly.

Irrelevant or exaggerated claims: Making claims which, although perhaps true, are irrelevant or meaningless, such as advertising yourself as the most environmentally friendly company in an industry which is innately damaging to the environment. Examples of this include the cigarette and tobacco industry or the airline industry. It’s not much good being the best of a very bad lot.

Another example of this is focusing on one green attribute of your business when everything else about it is damaging to the environment. An example of this may be a recyclable lid for a plastic bottle which is non-biodegradable.

Out-of-date data: If a company is using data or statistics that is more than a few years old to emphasise their eco-friendliness, they’re almost certainly either no longer as eco-friendly or not eco-friendly by today’s standards. If a company doesn’t have recent or current data to offer on their practices, a consumer should be suspicious.

Needlessly complicated language or jargon: If a company uses hopelessly confusing, incomprehensible language, or terms and phrases that only an environmental scientist could fully understand, they may be trying to hide something. The environmental practices of a company should be simple, specific and easy to comprehend by everyone. A lack of transparency should always be a cause for concern.

Straight-up lies: Finally, and most boldly, some companies may just simply lie outright about their greenness without any attempt of stretching or embellishing the truth. In some ways, this can be the hardest hallmark of greenwashing to spot. If a company decides to just plainly lie, they can fabricate as much data or statistics as they want in order to sell the lie.

However, this is where common sense or intuition comes into play. If a company uses data or a statistic that just doesn’t feel right or rings true, you should investigate further. Likewise, if a company uses an endorsement for their greenness from a third-party you’ve never heard of or you sense lacks credibility, check their credentials. A company should always be held responsible for the environmental claims they make.

How You Can Help

The individual shouldn’t wait for big corporations to take positive environmental action. They have a responsibility to do this themselves. Many individuals have become much more connected with the environment, spending more time in nature and learning to appreciate its beauty and the immense threat it is facing. People are now finding their own ways to contribute to the environmentalism cause, through planting trees and choosing non-plastic solutions to packaging.

The environment isn’t just important to ‘tree huggers’ anymore. It is of the utmost importance to everybody who is well-informed and educated. A business that doesn’t plan for this change in value systems may suffer severe revenue loss or customer decline.

As illustrated from the above points, reliable and trustworthy information is our greatest weapon against the insidious practice of greenwashing. A lie can only prosper in the absence of informed minds. As consumers become more and more aware and knowledgeable, greenwashing is not only becoming less pervasive, but less possible.

Irish Trees offers the opportunity to plant trees to both individuals and businesses. Trees can be planted as gifts, as memorials, as a loyalty token, as a thank you to someone and as a means of celebration or marking an event. Trees can be planted by a business as a means of carbon neutralising their staff or simply as a donation to the planet.

Contact Bob Hamilton at 00353 86 2558531 to discuss how you can make a difference to the environment. One tree will be planted for every call received.

Article written by Nicholas Collender.

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

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Irish Trees History and Tradition, Superstition and Spiritualism

Irish Trees History, Tradition, Superstition and Spiritualism 

From the early Ogham alphabet, also known as the Tree Alphabet, to the tradition of putting the leaves of the Irish holly tree inside of one’s home to protect fairies, trees have been a staple in Irish storytelling.  

One of the most significant Irish trees in Irish Trees History and Tradition has been the oak tree. 

Because the Irish oak tree has represented strength and height it has association with Taranis, the Celtic god of thunder and lightning. 

Trefuilngid Tre-eochair

Another Celtic deity that is associated with the Irish oak tree is Trefuilngid Tre-eochair.  

Tre-eochair was a towering man who, on the day of Christ’s crucifixion, arrived at Tara, in County Meath (the royal county). He brought with him a branch that grew apples, acorns, and hazelnuts.

He asked the High King to bring together the 14 wisest men in Ireland who were chosen to learn all wisdom from the Irish tree seeds.  

Fintan, the wisest of all, planted each of the seeds in various parts of Ireland.

Ireland’s 5 Sacred Trees

One Irish tree was planted in County Meath. A tree was planted in County Carlow. One was planted in County Westmeath. Another was planted in County Kildare. The last was planted right in the center of Ireland, also known as Uisneach. 

The Irish trees from these seeds are known as Ireland’s 5 sacred trees.  

The first Irish tree is the Eó Mugna, an oak that produced fruit from many different trees. This Irish tree was thought to have descended from the original Tree of Knowledge. 

This Irish tree also grew the apples, acorns, and hazelnuts that was featured on the branch brought by Trefuilngid Tre-eochair. 

The other sacred trees were Tortan, Eó Ruis, Craeb Daithí, and Craeb Uisnig. Three of these trees were Ash and Eó Ruis was Yew.  

The placement of each of these Irish trees is important, aside from being placed in each province of Ireland. The Eó Mugna’s position meant that it grew tall over the River Shannon.  

In the Underworld, it is also said to have been touched by Connla’s Well. This well is known for inducing inspiration and knowledge.  

Superstition and History

Each of the five Irish trees is also associated with a different trait. 

The Irish oak tree is associated with inspiration and knowledge. Tortan is associated with magic and witchcraft. Eó Ruis is associated with death, destruction, and rebirth. Craeb Uisnig is associated with strife.  

Irish oak trees are also associated with many historical events. 

Tree groves, especially oak trees, have been used as places of worship and battle. 

Historically, Irish oak trees have also been essential in the Irish way of life. They provided shelter, fuel, building materials, and habitats that supported wildlife as a food supply.  

Irish oak trees integrate themselves into Irish culture also by acting as the stem of the names of many Irish towns. These include Kildare and Derry as Dair is the Irish root word for oak.  

With all of the impact oak trees have had on Irish folklore and history make your own mark with an oak tree by planting one in memoriam of a loved one, for a birthday, anniversary, birth of a child, wedding, or other special occasion through Irish Trees.  

Researched, Written, Edited, Posted by Maddie Michel

Blog Archive


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Irish Trees – Mythology and Folklore

Irish Trees – Mythology and folklore are often celebrated for the numerous benefits they provide for the environment. However, the Celts worshipped trees long before their environmental values were discovered, which can be seen through their mythology and folklore. 

The Irish’s love for trees is reflected across the country as over ten thousand places in Ireland contain a tree in their name. This includes the county of Derry, whose named evolved from the Gaelic name for a place of Oak trees.

Our fascination and admiration for Irish trees stemmed largely from the fact that they serve as symbols for pure human life, as they too are living beings that fight to live and grow. 

The Irish people’s deep respect for trees can be seen throughout history. One of the earliest examples that showcase the Celt’s appreciation for trees is the Ogham alphabet, which was used to write the early Irish language.

Each letter of the Ogham alphabet is associated with a tree that begins with the sound that the letter depicts. Out of the Ogham alphabet grew the Celtic Tree Calendar which consists of thirteen months, each of which is symbolized by a tree and its ogham letter. The roots of the calendar lie within ancient Celtic folklore. 

Irish folklore and mythology is saturated with tributes to trees. According to Celtic mythology a tree, in particular a hazel tree, was the first creation on Earth. 

The first Irish hazel tree, which grew upon the Well of Wisdom, was said to have held all the knowledge of the universe within its branches. When a salmon in the Well of Wisdom ate the nuts that fell from the hazel tree, it obtained all the knowledge of the universe that the tree bore, becoming the Salmon of Knowledge. 

The legend goes that the first man to eat this salmon would then have all the knowledge passed on to them. The man to do so was Fionn MacCumhaill, who later used this knowledge to become the leader of Fianna, a band of famed warriors in Irish mythology. 

Yet the Irish folklore tales regarding trees do not end there. Due to their extraordinary structure, with their roots spreading underground and their branches reaching high in the sky, ancient Celts perceived trees as doorways to the underworld and heavens. 

The ancient Irish also believed Irish trees were home to the spirits of their ancestors. As such, trees in ancient Ireland were believed to be protectors. 

5 Irish trees in particular were known as the “Guardian Trees of Ireland”, which sheltered each of the five provinces. Celtic folklore describes the “Guardian Trees of Ireland” as follows: Eó Mugna (Oak tree), Bile Tortan (Ash tree), Eó Ruis (Yew tree), Craeb Daithí (Ash tree), Craeb Uisnig (Ash tree). 

Legend says these trees grew from seeds given by a descendant of the otherworld. 

The Celts further showcased their respect for trees by tributing a specific symbol to individual tree species. In Celtic history, Oak, Ash and Hawthorn trees were the most sacred trees. 

Oak trees embodied truth, courage, and wisdom. The Oak tree is also featured in the Celtic Tree of Life symbol.  Irish Ash trees were cherished for their strength and healing power. 

Hawthorn trees were believed to be representative of love and protection.

Perhaps due to their prominence in Irish history, which brands Hawthorn trees as a tree to be respected, Celtic folklore tells of how these trees are also the subject of a variety of superstitions. One of the most famous examples of such is the “Irish Fairy Tree”. 

Believed to be sacred to the fairies, and possibly even serve as a gateway between worlds, lone hawthorn trees that stand in the middle of a field are never cut down. 

These trees are thought to bring good luck to the landowner and terrible misfortune upon whomever damages it. 

This superstition is so widely shared that it is not uncommon to drive around Ireland and see fields of farmland with Irish fairy trees right in the middle, as many farmers fear to cut them down and instead choose to work around them.

While many “Irish fairy trees” exist, the most well-known is located on the Hill of Tara

People often travel to these trees in order to tie ribbons around them, representing their wishes or prayers, and many leave gifts behind as a sign of gratitude for a wish that was granted. 

The rich history of trees in cultures around the world, particularly Irish mythology and folklore, tied with the environmental benefits they provide make the planting of an Irish tree the perfect gift for any occasion. 

The planting of an Irish tree to memorialize a loved one is growing increasingly popular around the world. 

Article written by Charlotte Morten.

Blog Archive


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Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

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Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

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Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

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Native Irish Trees and their Ever-growing Importance

Native Irish trees have always been rich in history and mythology.

Trees have featured prominently in the culture and society of Ireland from the times of the ancient Celts who believed that Irish trees had mystical powers that could aid them in times of hardship.

Several centuries later, there is a re-emerging interest in the native trees of Ireland. While few may believe that trees have magical abilities today, it does seem that trees in Ireland have untapped potential in helping us overcome a number of adversities, such as the struggle against climate change.

Organisations such as Coillte have fully dedicated themselves to increasing the amount of carbon sequestering done by trees by managing Ireland’s forests on an entirely sustainable basis. In early 2021, Coillte reported how the visitor numbers to their local forests had tripled during lockdown. This proves that Ireland’s woodlands are not just of an environmental benefit to people but an emotional one too.

A little over two years ago, the Irish government announced an ambitious plan to plant 440 million trees in Ireland by the year 2040. This huge endeavour is being undertaken in an effort to combat Ireland’s greenhouse gas emissions. It is hoped that this incredible increase in the number of native Irish trees will ultimately create a massive carbon sink that will have a significant positive impact on the currently dire climate crisis.

In order for this goal to be realised, a grand total of 22 million trees in Ireland will have to be planted every year. As outlined in the government’s 2019 Climate Action Plan, they intend to plant an average of approximately 8000 hectares a year.

As the trees of Ireland look set to play a much bigger role in our lives, slowly covering more and more of our landscape in the years to come, it may be worthwhile to take a closer look at some of the native Irish trees in which we here at Irish Trees specialise.

What Trees are Native to Ireland?

The Common Oak Tree is one of many native Irish trees and is able to grow in all Irish soils. Oak trees are some of the longest living trees and are even capable of living for many centuries, provided they avoid infestation or disease. Remarkably, Oak trees can produce 2000 acorns every year and potentially over 10 million acorns throughout their entire lifetime. There are over 600 different kinds of species of Oak trees and some can grow to be over 45 meters tall. The ancient celts believed Oak trees were associated with wisdom and strength. Perhaps this is why they are such a popular choice for memorial trees.

Hazel is another of the native trees of Ireland. It played an important role in ancient Ireland when it was regarded as the Tree of Knowledge. It was widely believed that its nuts could grant immeasurable wisdom and knowledge once consumed. Hazel trees are perhaps one of the smaller varieties of native Irish trees, typically growing somewhere between 12 and 20 ft. The normal lifespan of a Hazel tree is usually 70 to 80 years if well managed. Hazel trees also act as an invaluable wildlife food source as they produce an abundance of fruit and nuts.

The Rowan Mountain Ash is a relatively small native Irish tree but its bright red berries add a vivid splash of colour to the Irish landscape. Within Celtic mythology, the Rowan tree symbolises courage and protection and is seen as the Tree of Life. The Rowan tree favours well drained areas but should thrive and flourish in most soils. Rowan trees are often used in gardens and parks as they are known for their compact size and pretty appearance.

The Holly Tree is also commonly found throughout Ireland. Another relatively small and visually-pleasing tree, many people consider it bad luck to cut down a Holly tree. A Holly tree is either male or female but only the female trees are capable of producing berries. If planted and nurtured in the right conditions, the Holly tree can live for up to 100 years. The Holly tree was considered to be highly sacred in ancient Celtic times and was seen as a symbol of peace and goodwill.

Crab Apple Trees are small deciduous trees that can grow between 4 to 12 metres and live for anywhere between 30 to 70 years, depending on climate and care. These native Irish trees remain attractive looking all year around and are known for their distinctive, colourful petals and blossoms which can range from white, pink or red. The ancient Celts associated this particular native tree of Ireland with love and marriage.

The Alder Tree is a fast-growing, rounded-leaf tree that can grow to a height of 20 metres. One of the most traditional and widely-spread of the native trees in Ireland, the Alder tree tends to grow in damp, marshy areas. The Alder tree has proven to be particularly effective in improving soil fertility. It possesses a bark that is dark and deeply fissured. In ancient Ireland, the trunk of the Alder tree was often used for shields and weapons.

The Sycamore Tree is a large deciduous tree that can grow to a height of 35 metres and live for up to 600 years. This native Irish tree is known for its distinctive bark which is covered in a creamy white and reddish-brown patched surface. The seeds of Sycamore trees are known as “helicopters”, because of their wings that rotate and carry them along the air. Sycamores can grow very fast and their branches are known to spread out to give them a large and impressive rounded dome shape.

The increasing recognition of the importance and effectiveness of native Irish trees in reversing the consequences of climate change looks set to continue. In the coming years, trees will become a steadily more noticeable feature of the Irish landscape as they serve their natural purpose. Therefore, it is best that we all familiarise ourselves with the many native trees of Ireland.

Article written by Nicholas Collender.

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Why You Should Plant a Tree in Memory of Someone

The Solace and Strength of Memorial Trees

To plant a tree in memory of someone is to honour their legacy in a unique and poignant way. Memorial trees serve as a physical, tangible representation of a person’s time on Earth and allow them to continue to have a positive impact on the planet even after they have left it.

Due to the innumerable environmental benefits of planting trees, gifting a tree in memory of someone is also a gift to future generations. A gesture that is both deeply touching in its symbolism and extremely beneficial in its practicality, there is no better way to honour the memory of a loved one than to plant a tree memorial.

People who suffer a bereavement, and then plant a tree in memory, often describe it as a very cathartic and healing experience. The sorrow and grief felt by the passing of a loved one can be profound and overwhelming. Mourners can find themselves set adrift in a world of anguish and confusion.

One healthy, comforting way to alleviate and process that pain is to get back in touch with the simple beauty of nature and plant a tree in memory. For those who suffer a loss, it can be difficult to initially navigate the new world in which their loved one is no longer present.

The physical and practical tribute of planting a tree in memory of someone can help them make sense of their loss by translating it into something tangible, permanent and rooted in the earth. This simple act can help solidify their sorrow into something of substance that is easier to confront and comprehend.

Planting a tree in memory can also be done as a gift by someone who is not directly or most affected by a death but cares deeply for those who are. It isn’t always easy to find the best gift or tribute to console someone who is mourning. Flowers and cards can be sent, but flowers eventually wilt and cards serve a limited purpose.

This is why gifting a tree in memory is such a lasting and heart-warming act of remembrance and compassion. Memorial trees can help express and soothe a person’s grief by acting as an external symbol of the internal pain inflicted by a loved one’s passing. But they are also a symbol of the boundless joy and happiness their life brought to others.

The benefits of planting a tree in memory of someone don’t just extend to the bereft but, in truth, to everyone. Of all the ways to memorialise and honour a lost loved one, memorial trees are easily the most widely beneficial and environmentally friendly.

Planting a tree in memory gives hope to the future

The positive impacts on the planet of gifting a tree in memory are manifold. It is a tribute that is worthy of all but particularly fitting for those who were environmentally conscious or concerned with the wellbeing and future of the planet. No other memorial gift or act of remembrance is greener in its effects or more sustainable to the environment.

Gifting a tree in memory can serve the dual purpose of tackling the harmful effects of climate change along with a person’s grief. Trees have the natural ability to cleanse and improve the quality of our air. Trees remove carbon dioxide and greenhouse gases from the atmosphere and replace them with clean, pure oxygen.

This physical process can be seen as similar to the symbolic process of planting a memorial tree, which has the power to absorb a person’s pain and sorrow and help transform it into acceptance and peace. A higher number of trees planted will inevitably lead to a lower carbon economy.

This isn’t the only environmental benefit produced when you plant a tree in memory of someone. The positive effects of planting memorial trees are endless, particularly in the fight against climate change. Trees help in causing more rain to evaporate before it reaches the ground and this reduces surface runoff.

Reduced surface runoff helps reduce the amount of potentially dangerous and harmful chemicals that are transported to our waterways and pollute our systems. It also reduces the likelihood of flooding as well as the risk of soil erosion, which can severely damage the fertility and moisture of land.

Planting memorial trees can also provide shelter and sustenance to various wildlife. When you gift a tree in memory, you are also creating a home and food source for birds and animals and helping preserve and enhance our biodiversity. The physical tribute to your loved one will help ensure the survival and prosperity of countless woodland animals.

Planting a tree in memory of someone is a comforting and healing act of preserving their legacy and a practical means of ensuring our environment’s sustainability. When words fail us, the simple but powerful action of planting a memorial tree or tree of remembrance can help relieve the extraordinary and all-consuming pain left in the wake of a loved one’s passing, whether it be our own pain or the pain of another.

There is no better way of memorialising a loved one than by making such a positive and meaningful difference to the world. Planting a tree in memory will prove to be a tribute to their life that will outlive us all and continue to heal the planet long after it has healed our hearts.

Memorial trees help to sustain both the health of the environment and the memory of a loved one.

Article written by Nicholas Collender.

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Plant a tree of history – Native Irish Trees

A History of Ireland’s Trees – Plant a tree of history

While Ireland’s history boasts achievements in stone and bronze, it is the forest and the Irish wood people that facilitated the advancement of humanity.

The Irish language itself is based on eighteen letters pronounced after the tree. While the Romans destroyed most of the ancient forests of Europe, a large percentage of Ireland was under ancient forestry up until the 17th Century. Ireland had clusters of valuable ancient woodlands. 

The story of Ireland’s trees, deforestation and tree planting is one topic that is underreported with very little academic or political coverage however a number of important works have been published. Nigel Everett believed that pre-colonial farming is one aspect that possibly led to Ireland’s forest decline. When the Tudors and Stuarts began to survey the land, they found that they were dealing with disappointing levels of Irish woodlands. Eileen McCracken wrote about how Ireland’s forests were only at 12.5 percent by the time the Tudors arrived while Everett suggests this percentage was actually four percent by 1650.

Another cause of the decline in Ireland’s trees is the Elizabethan wars for military purposes and speculators being granted woodlands before Cromwell. One of them being Sir Walter Raleigh who was granted twenty thousand acres of woodland in Cork which was then sold to Richard Boyle. England was also expanding their empire at this time and was keen to use Ireland as a source of food production which contributed to more of this deforestation. The provisions for the colonies in America in the 1600s were also coming from Ireland meaning an industry developed in making casks and barrels for transportation.

While opinions vary, these figures show that much of Ireland’s ecosystem was gone and that much of the forestry of Ireland that was available was cleared as part of a military operation by England to secure the colony. Elizabeth I was known for the destruction of the woodland to deprive the Irish of this shelter. Many species were lost including the wild boar and then wolf in the 18th century. However, small areas of woodland have survived in Ireland.

The descendants of the planters that inherited large estates were the people who took the first steps in planting trees in Ireland and between 1766 and 1803, 25 million trees in an effort to Plant a tree of history. However, without support, tree planting in Ireland declined and Ireland became an agricultural producer. In the 19th century, Ireland struggled with Catholic emancipation, the Great Famine, poverty, and a decline in population due to emigration yet saw the rise of small farmers. With leaders such as Charles Stewart Parnell who devoted interest in the restoration of Irish trees and forests, the Government was also met with the realisation that Ireland was missing this resource. Ireland, like Britain, was dominated by planting conifer in the 19th century to the present day because this was faster growing. 

The Irish Forestry was established in 1900 and in 1903 Professor John Nisbet of the West of Scotland Agricultural College, found that one-fifth of Ireland which was thought to be a wasteland, could be planted with forestry. However, it was in 1948 that Ireland finally saw an increase in tree planting led by Sean McBride and Laura Hobson. 

Currently, Coillte Nurseries produce 25 million bare-rooted plants every year, most of which are used to renew our own forests. To Plant a Tree, the seed is required every year, but trees don’t always produce a good crop of seeds.  In response, Coillte Nurseries manages Ireland’s National Tree Seed centre, collecting in years when the harvest is good.

Another supporting business is Forestry Services Ltd., a private forestry company specialising in providing forestry services to all woodland owners and persons considering forestry. Forestry Services do everything from planting to harvesting to timber sales to reforestation. Investors can purchase both existing forestry plantations and lands suitable for afforestation. 

It’s very common to plant a tree in memory of a loved one or to gift a birth tree in celebration of the birth of a baby. Be a part of this movement. When you gift a memorial tree in Ireland you are also contributing to reforestation and the environment. Plant a tree of history.

Researched and written by Roisin Maguire

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Planting Native Irish Trees -The Environmental Benefits

Planting native Irish trees isn’t just a meaningful way to cherish the memory of someone who has passed, nor is it simply a way to gift a tree to a loved one in times of celebration. Planting trees has a myriad of significant benefits for the environment.

By their very nature, trees serve to both cleanse and protect the environment from harmful substances and activities as they slowly help to repair the damage foolishly inflicted onto the environment by mankind. It is not inaccurate to think of planting a tree as akin to opening a window in a room full of thick dark smoke.

The woodlands of Ireland are our greatest and most effective natural asset in detoxifying our air and lands. Therefore, few things are as crucial to maintaining and improving the health of our environment than planting trees.

First and foremost, planting trees helps to slow down and combat the devastating effects of climate change. Trees remove carbon dioxide from the air and replace it with clean, pure oxygen. Trees absorb carbon and store it within their trunk, branches and leaves in a process known as sequestering. As long as a tree lives, and trees can live for many decades and even centuries, the carbon remains trapped within.

It is helpful to think of the planting of native Irish trees as similar to creating natural sponges, soaking up countless amounts of carbon dioxide from the air and keeping our surroundings clean and fresh. The excessive production of greenhouse gases from destructive activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels for transportation and manufacturing, can be partially counterbalanced by the planting of native Irish trees.

Another important benefit of tree planting is the fact that trees and their root systems help to purify and slow rainwater before it seeps back into our streams and rivers. Trees act as a buffer between the water falling from the sky as rain and the water coursing in our rivers.

Trees in Irish woodlands intercept rain as it falls, providing rain with more places to land such as on their branches or leaves. This means that much of rainwater evaporates before it even reaches the ground and this is pivotal to reducing surface runoff.

Extensive surface runoff can cause streams and rivers to swell and overflow, breaking their banks and ultimately flooding. The roots of large trees near rivers also help to stabilise and strengthen river banks and prevent them from collapsing. The roots of trees promote the infiltration of water from the surface of the ground into the soil as tree roots absorb large amounts of water.

The extra surface area provided by leaf canopies and foliage helps to reduce the detrimental effects of soil erosion by minimising the impact of rain onto the ground. The more times that people plant a tree means there is more surface area to intercept the fall of rain. Rainwater slowly drains down the branches and trunk of a tree and is then soaked up by the soil.

If it weren’t for trees, rainwater would hit the ground with unimpeded force and wash the soil away rather than be soaked up by it. Excessive soil erosion can lead to infertile land, stripping soil of its moisture and nutrients.

Infertile, degraded land is far less capable of absorbing and holding water, which causes increased amounts of pollution and sedimentation in rivers as well as increasing the risk of flooding. Native Irish trees act as natural filters to soil and rivers. This is yet another reason why planting trees in Ireland is so vital to the health of the environment.

Planting trees in Ireland is also imperative to maintaining the natural balance of the environment and its inhabitants. Simply put, birds and animals need trees in order to survive and the native Irish trees found throughout our woodlands are the most critical component of protecting and preserving our wildlife.

Trees act as a limitless source of shelter and sustenance for countless woodland creatures. Trees and their undergrowth provide an abundance of food for various wildlife while also providing them with a natural habitat. The cover and shade supplied by the canopies of leaves and foliage protects small animals from harsh conditions and predators, both animal and human.

Our environment would be greatly damaged by the absence of all the animals who depend on the trees of Ireland, which is why we must conserve and expand the environments in which they thrive. Every time you gift a tree in honour or celebration of someone, you are also providing a home and food source to the many animals inhabiting the woodlands of Ireland.

There are no conceivable negatives to planting trees in Ireland but there are countless positives. Nature-based solutions, such as planting trees, are consistently found to be the most effective in the fight against climate change and it is something to which you can easily contribute.

Gifting a tree in memory of a loved one is also an invaluable gift to the future of our precious planet. It serves a dual purpose of remembering those who have passed and considering the health and happiness of generations to come. Planting trees is the best weapon we have at our disposal in tackling the climate crisis and saving our environment.

Your memorial tree can be in honour of both the past and the future.

Article written by Nicholas Collender.

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

A History of Ireland’s Trees – Plant a tree of history

While Ireland’s history boasts achievements in stone and bronze, it is the forest and the Irish wood people that facilitated the advancement of humanity.

The Irish language itself is based on eighteen letters pronounced after the tree. While the Romans destroyed most of the ancient forests of Europe, a large percentage of Ireland was under ancient forestry up until the 17th Century. Ireland had clusters of valuable ancient woodlands. 

The story of Ireland’s trees and deforestation is one topic that is underreported with very little academic or political coverage however a number of important works have been published. Nigel Everett believed that pre-colonial farming is one aspect that possibly led to Ireland’s forest decline. When the Tudors and Stuarts began to survey the land, they found that they were dealing with disappointing levels of Irish woodlands. Eileen McCracken wrote about how Ireland’s forests were only at 12.5 percent by the time the Tudors arrived while Everett suggests this percentage was actually four percent by 1650.

Another cause of the decline in Ireland’s trees is the Elizabethan wars for military purposes and speculators being granted woodlands before Cromwell. One of them being Sir Walter Raleigh who was granted twenty thousand acres of woodland in Cork which was then sold to Richard Boyle. England was also expanding their empire at this time and was keen to use Ireland as a source of food production which contributed to more of this deforestation. The provisions for the colonies in America in the 1600s were also coming from Ireland meaning an industry developed in making casks and barrels for transportation.

While opinions vary, these figures show that much of Ireland’s ecosystem was gone and that much of the forestry of Ireland that was available was cleared as part of a military operation by England to secure the colony. Elizabeth I was known for the destruction of the woodland to deprive the Irish of this shelter. Many species were lost including the wild boar and then wolf in the 18th century. However, small areas of woodland have survived in Ireland.

The descendants of the planters that inherited large estates were the people who took the first steps in replanting Ireland’s trees and between 1766 and 1803, 25 million trees were planted. However, without support, tree planting in Ireland declined and Ireland became an agricultural producer. In the 19th century, Ireland struggled with Catholic emancipation, the Great Famine, poverty, and a decline in population due to emigration yet saw the rise of small farmers. With leaders such as Charles Stewart Parnell who devoted interest in the restoration of Irish trees and forests, the Government was also met with the realisation that Ireland was missing this resource. Ireland, like Britain, was dominated by planting conifer in the 19th century to the present day because this was faster growing. 

The Irish Forestry was established in 1900 and in 1903 Professor John Nisbet of the West of Scotland Agricultural College, found that one-fifth of Ireland which was thought to be a wasteland, could be planted with forestry. However, it was in 1948 that Ireland finally saw an increase in tree planting led by Sean McBride and Laura Hobson. 

Currently, Coillte Nurseries produce 25 million bare-rooted plants every year, most of which are used to renew our own forests. To plant a tree, seed is required every year, but trees don’t always produce it.  In response, Coillte Nurseries manages Ireland’s National Tree Seed centre, collecting in years when the harvest is good.

Another movement is Forestry Services Ltd., a private forestry company specialising in providing forestry services to all woodland owners and persons considering forestry. Forestry Services do everything from planting a tree to harvesting, to timber sales to reforestation. Investors can purchase both existing forestry plantations and lands suitable for afforestation. 

It’s very common to plant a tree in memory of a loved one or to gift a birth tree in celebration of the birth of a baby. Be a part of this movement. When you gift a memorial tree in Ireland you are also contributing to reforestation- so plant a tree!

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Press release -March 2021. Irish Memorial Trees

Press release -March 2021.                 Irish Memorial Trees

Covid 19 has had a huge impact on people’s lives and none more so that families and friends of families trying to find a way to grieve and offer comfort to those who have lost family during this time.

To offer an alternative way to help people, Dublin Man, Bob Hamilton had expanded his Irish Urns Business to include Irish Memorial Trees.

Bob Hamilton and John Doran- Irish Memorial Trees

What is a memorial tree?

Arranging a memorial tree with Irish Urns and Memorial trees means that they will plant a tree on your behalf and a hand-made hand-written sympathy card will be sent , along with an A4 personalised and printed Planting Certificate to a member of the grieving family.

Where are these trees planted?

Irish Memorial Trees have a 10-acre peaceful lakeside location in North County Dublin and they mix a range of 8 different native Irish tree types. The favourite being the Irish oak, The Mountain Ash a beautiful flowering and berry covered tree and often the whitethorn, Crab-apple, Holly, Birch, Hazel and Alder are also popular choices.

Bob has a high degree of empathy and his customer skills have him receiving nothing but 5 stars in his many reviews, as he goes above and beyond to help people choose the right tree and the right words for both the Card and the Certificate. Irish memorial trees email a digital certificate to the person ordering and post the Card and certificate to their chosen addressee.

Bob understands death and loss, not just from his own personal experiences,  but also from his related business – Irish Urns and Keepsakes Limited

He offers a truly personal service and feedback on his Irish Memorial Trees have been amazing, not just from the buyers of the service but from the family members receiving the Certificate and Card. They are deeply touched by such an enduring and thoughtful act.

Irish Memorial trees and the Irish Hospice foundation recently announced a partnership that also allows people to plant and dedicate a tree while also donating to a cause that is so needed right now more than ever.

Bob would love to be able to let people know that this service exists and is keen to expand on the positive benefits and impact of this service, not just to the sender or receiver but also on the environment and the legacy of those lost.

Bob and John Chatting at Landrover with dog at irish trees
Bob and John Chatting at Landrover with dog at irish trees

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Irish Tree species

  • Crataegus Monogyna – Whitethorn our most common hedgerow plant. It puts on a stunning display of white flowers in spring and red berries in Autumn. CLICK HERE TO SEE IMAGE.
  • Symbolism: Sacred hope, protection, and cleansing against malignant spirits and was thought by many to have a sacred quality as it was one of several plants designated as the bush from which Christ’s crown of thorns was made.Ogham lunar cycle Mar19-Apr14.
  • Sorbus Aucuparia – Mountain Ash Rowan is a small deciduous tree. A bountiful display of red berries in the autumn perfect for wildlife. CLICK HERE TO SEE IMAGE.
  • Symbolism:A tree revered as a protective symbol. Honored by the Celts for its balance of beauty and storehouse of wisdom embodied within its towering strength and hardiness.It resonates a high, clear vibration that naturally transforms lower (negative) energies.Ogham lunar cycle Nov29-Dec26
  • Alnus Glutinosa – Common Alder Common in wet ground, marshes, and stream-sides. Rounded leaves are light green.  Fast-growing. Grows to a max of 20m. CLICK HERE TO SEE IMAGE.
  • Symbolism: Tree of Resurrection, Protection & all-knowing powers.Ogham lunar cycle Dec27-Jan22.
  • Acer Pseudoplatanus – Sycamore is a large deciduous tree that reaches 20–35 m tall at maturity, with a broad, domed crown It is noted for its tolerance of wind. CLICK HERE TO SEE IMAGE.
  • Symbolism: Enduring love and protection, due to its resistance against the more destructive elemental forces of nature.Ogham lunar cycle Sept5-Oct1.
  • Quercus Robur (native) – Common Oak is a hardy, slow-growing tree, forming a large round-headed native deciduous tree with acorns on long stems in autumn. CLICK HERE TO SEE IMAGE
  • Symbolism: Cosmic storehouse of wisdom embodied within its towering strength.Ogham lunar cycle apr15-May12.
  • Malus Sylvestris – Common Crab Apple. A small tree, which produces pinkish-white flowers, birds, and insects appreciates the heavy crops of fruit. CLICK HERE TO SEE IMAGE.
  • Symbolism: The only native Irish Apple tree -Crab apples have long been associated with eternal love and marriage. Ogham lunar cycle Jul8-Aug6.
  • Ailex Aquifolium – Holly – one of the few native broadleaf evergreen trees. Holly trees are either male or female, so we plant together as only the females produce berries. CLICK HERE TO SEE IMAGE.
  • Click Here to see our Holly Christmas ad.
  • Symbolism: Tree of Protection -Its spirit and essence manifest the energy of protection with style, dignity, and honor even in the midst of great challenges.Ogham lunar cycle May13-June9.
  • Corylus Avellana –  Hazel is commonly found as part of the undergrowth in Oak and Ash Woodland. The nuts are much sought after food source for wildlife. CLICK HERE TO SEE IMAGE.
  • Symbolism: Tree of Knowledge -Wisdom and poetic Inspiration -In Irish folklore, the Hazel tree was the home of “Bile Ratha,” the poetic fairy. The “Salmon of knowledge” was said to have eaten its nuts dropped into its sacred pool from the hazel tree growing beside it. Ogham lunar cycle June10-July7.

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Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

The Irish Memorial tree – a poem

When Great Trees Fall

Maya AngelouBy Maya Angelou 

When great trees fall,
rocks on distant hills shudder,
lions hunker down
in tall grasses,
and even elephants
lumber after safety.

When great trees fall
in forests,
small things recoil into silence,
their senses
eroded beyond fear.

When great souls die,
the air around us becomes
light, rare, sterile.
We breathe, briefly.
Our eyes, briefly,
see with
a hurtful clarity.
Our memory, suddenly sharpened,
examines,
gnaws on kind words
unsaid,
promised walks
never taken.

Great souls die and
our reality, bound to
them, takes leave of us.
Our souls,
dependent upon their
nurture,
now shrink, wizened.
Our minds, formed
and informed by their
radiance,
fall away.
We are not so much maddened
as reduced to the unutterable ignorance
of dark, cold
caves.

And when great souls die,
after a period peace blooms,
slowly and always
irregularly. Spaces fill
with a kind of
soothing electric vibration.
Our senses, restored, never
to be the same, whisper to us.
They existed. They existed.

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

The Shamrock

Derived from the Irish word seamróg, meaning ‘little clover,’ shamrock refers to a plant with 3 leaves rather than the clovers four.It was coined by Edmund Campion, an English scholar in 1571 when he wrote of the ‘wild Irish’ people eating the plant. In fact, the Irish at that time included wood-sorrel as a herb in their diet, which looked quite similar to clover.

It is popularly believed that St. Patrick once used the clover in his preaching to symbolize the Christian Holy Trinity, although the first written account of this does not appear until Caleb Threlkeld wrote about it in 1726.

The clover was a sacred plant of the Irish Druids, due to the cluster of its three heart-shaped leaves. Three was a sacred number in Irish mythology, perhaps inspiring St. Patrick to ‘Christianize’ it in his teachings.

The Metrical Dindshenchas, a collection of ancient poems dating back to the 11th century, known as ‘the lore of places’, indicates that the shamrock was important long before the arrival of St. Patrick.

Teltown (in Irish Tailten, named for Tailltiu who was Lugh Lámhfhada’s foster mother) was described as a plane covered in blossoming clover. Brigid founded her religious order in Co. Kildare (in Irish Cill Darra, meaning ‘church of the oak’) in a blossom-covered clover field. These beautiful meadows were called St. Brigid’s Pastures, ‘in which no plow is ever suffered to turn a furrow.’ It was said that, although cattle were allowed to graze there from morning till night, the next day the clover remained as luxuriant as ever.

In later times it became traditional for Irish men to wear the shamrock in their hats on St. Patrick’s Day.

After mass, they would visit the local drinking establishment to ‘drown the shamrock’ in ‘St. Patrick’s Pot.’ This involved placing their shamrock in the last beverage of the day, draining the glass, then picking out the shamrock and tossing it over their left shoulder.

During the 18th century, the shamrock became popular as a national emblem worn by members of the Irish Volunteers, local warbands raised to defend Ireland against the threat of Spanish and French invasion.

Now, every year on St. Patrick’s Day, the Irish Taoiseach presents a Waterford crystal bowl featuring a shamrock design containing shamrocks to the US President in the White House.

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...

Music to calm the Soul

The world famous Irish fiddle player, Zoë Conway has been very generous in allowing me use her music filmed in Carlingford on the Irishurns website. We hope it might sooth some souls – The song is called Faoiseamh a Gheobhadsa or ‘I Will Find Solace’. Click or Tap here to play.

Blog Archive


Decent work and economic growth | SDG #8

Decent work, employment creation, social protection, rights at work, and social dialogue represent integral elements of Irish Trees philosophy. The Irish Trees approach is to bring about sustainability ...

Partnerships for the Goals | SDG #17

Our efforts for partnership for the goals. Irish Trees works in co-creation with the local community and the Irish diaspora abroad, while actively looking to create a wider network for collaboration.We ...

Clean Water | SDG #6

Fresh water represents 3% of our planet’s total water. Tree roots rebalance the water cycle.To keep the balance of the water cycle, rainwater must be absorbed by the soil and not just run off to rivers ...

Innovation and Infrastructure | SDG #9

Irish Trees is an innovative approach to bring about environmental sustainability through a commercial model, by creating a balance in ecological and economical growth. Our operations are a hybrid ...

Good Health & Wellbeing | SDG #3

Woodlands significantly contribute to health and wellbeing by providing natural restorative spaces for leisure, education and reflection.We were originally ‘forest people’ as we are at our most tranquil ...

Business Carbon footprint calculation.

Business Carbon foot print calculation and understanding. So, you want to reduce the impact your Business is having on the environment and by reducing its contribution to climate change. Some businesses ...

Trees and Carbon Dioxide

You may already know this but many people ask why do trees take carbon dioxide from the air. Fact - Trees sequester carbon –  the process of removal and long-term storage of carbon dioxide ...

Plant a tree – a simple gift to Nature

Be the difference - Tree the difference - see the difference Unlike the Memorial and Celebratory Tree options, this is is a way to help fund the planting of thousands of trees in Europe's largest rewilding ...

Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right?

Finding a thoughtful way to offer and show your condolences can be difficult. Sympathy Gifts and Bereavement gifts – what is right? Whether you’d like to pay your respects, give a memento to celebrate ...

Rewilding with Dunsany Reserve and IrishTrees.ie

The Dunsany Estate, which dates back to the 11th century, and is located about 30 minutes from Dublin Airport, covers 1600 acres – of this about 750 acres are being rewilded as a nature reserve. ...